facultas

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From facilis. Confer with facilitās.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

facultās f ‎(genitive facultātis); third declension

  1. ability, skill
  2. opportunity, chance

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative facultās facultātēs
genitive facultātis facultātum
dative facultātī facultātibus
accusative facultātem facultātēs
ablative facultāte facultātibus
vocative facultās facultātēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • facultas” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • facultas” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: facultatem alicui dare alicuius rei or ut possit...
    • to deprive a man of the chance of doing a thing: facultatem, potestatem alicui eripere, adimere
    • no opportunity of carrying out an object presents itself: nulla est facultas alicuius rei
    • oratorical talent: facultas dicendi
    • to be very rich: opibus, divitiis, bonis, facultatibus abundare
  • facultas” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

PortugueseEdit

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

facultas

  1. Informal second-person singular () present indicative form of facultar.
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