chance

See also: Chance

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cheance (accident, chance, luck), from Vulgar Latin cadentia (falling), from Latin cadō (I fall, I die). See also cadence, from the same Latin root.

NounEdit

chance (plural chances)

  1. (countable) An opportunity or possibility.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      Here was my chance. I took the old man aside, and two or three glasses of Old Crow launched him into reminiscence.
    We had the chance to meet the president last week.
  2. (uncountable) Random occurrence; luck.
    Why leave it to chance when a few simple steps will secure the desired outcome?
  3. (countable) The probability of something happening.
    There is a 30% chance of rain tomorrow.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

chance (third-person singular simple present chances, present participle chancing, simple past and past participle chanced)

  1. (archaic, intransitive) To happen by chance, to occur.
    It chanced that I found a solution the very next day.
    • Bible, Deuteronomy xxii. 6
      if a bird's nest chance to be before thee
    • Shakespeare
      I chanced on this letter.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. XV, Practical — Devotional
      Once [] it chanced that Geoffrey Riddell Bishop of Ely, a Prelate rather troublesome to our Abbot, made a request of him for timber from his woods towards certain edifices going on at Glemsford.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter XVIII
      Mr. Mason, shivering as some one chanced to open the door, asked for more coal to be put on the fire, which had burnt out its flame, though its mass of cinder still shone hot and red. The footman who brought the coal, in going out, stopped near Mr. Eshton's chair, and said something to him in a low voice, of which I heard only the words, "old woman,"—"quite troublesome."
  2. (archaic, transitive) To befall; to happen to.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. Lambarde to this entry?)
  3. To try or risk.
    Shall we carry the umbrella, or chance a rainstorm?
    • W. D. Howells
      Come what will, I will chance it.
  4. To discover something by chance.
    He chanced upon a kindly stranger who showed him the way.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

chance (comparative more chance, superlative most chance)

  1. (rare) Happening by chance, casual.
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, ch. VI, The Shoe Maker (Heron Book Centenial Edition)
      No crowd was about the door; no people were discernible at any of the many windows; not even a chance passer-by was in the street. An unnatural silence and desertion reigned there.

ReferencesEdit

StatisticsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French chance, from Vulgar Latin cadentia (falling), from Latin cadō (I fall, I die).

NounEdit

chance c (singular definite chancen, plural indefinite chancer)

  1. A chance

AntonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʃɑ̃s/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑ̃s

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cheance (accident, chance, luck), from Vulgar Latin cadentia (falling), from Latin cadēns, from cadō (I fall, I die). Doublet of cadence, borrowed from Italian.

NounEdit

chance f (plural chances)

  1. chance
  2. luck

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French chance

NounEdit

chance f (invariable)

  1. chance (possibility of a certain outcome)

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French chance.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chance f (plural chances)

  1. Probability
  2. chance, opportunity.

Related termsEdit

  • sem chance

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French chance.

NounEdit

chance f (plural chances)

  1. chance
Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 04:14