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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

fist +‎ -ic

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fistic (comparative more fistic, superlative most fistic)

  1. Of or pertaining to boxing or fighting with fists.
    • 1865?, Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend
      This was another common procedure on the part of the ladies of the Hole, when heated by verbal or fistic altercation.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare & Co.; Sylvia Beach, OCLC 560090630; republished London: Published for the Egoist Press, London by John Rodker, Paris, October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      Episode 12, The Cyclops
      The Englishman, whose right eye was nearly closed, took his corner where he was liberally drenched with water and when the bell went came on gamey and brimful of pluck, confident of knocking out the fistic Eblanite in jigtime.
    • 2009 April 27, Chris Zelkovich, “Sorry folks, but fights don't turn games around”, in Toronto Star[1]:
      Though analyst Gary Galley first said the fistic defeat would probably spell the end for Pittsburgh, he later agreed with his colleagues that Talbot's impression of a punching bag had indeed changed the course of the game.