EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English foisoun, from Old French foison, from Latin fūsiō, fūsiōnem. Doublet of fusion.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foison (plural foisons)

  1. (archaic) An abundance, a rich supply of.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Oedipus Tyrannus; Or, Swellfoot The Tyrant: A Tragedy in Two Acts:
      The earth did never mean her foizon
      For those who crown life’s cup with poison
      Of fanatic rage and meaningless revenge—
      But for those radiant spirits, who are still
      The standard-bearers in the van of Change.
  2. (archaic) Harvest.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i], page 7:
      Gon. [] Treaſon, fellony, / Sword, Pike, Knife, Gun, or neede of any Engine / Would I not haue : but Nature ſhould bring forth / Of it owne kinde, all foyzon, all abundance / To feed my innocent people.
  3. (chiefly Scotland) Strength, power.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French foison, from Old French foison, inherited from Latin fūsiōnem, singular accusative of fūsiō. Doublet of fusion, a borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fwa.zɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

foison f (uncountable)

  1. (dated) abundance, great deal, load
    J'ai foison de copines: I've got plenty of girlfriends.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French foison.

NounEdit

foison f (plural foisons)

  1. much; a lot of

DescendantsEdit

  • French: foison

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin fūsiō, fūsiōnem.

NounEdit

foison f (oblique plural foisons, nominative singular foison, nominative plural foisons)

  1. much; a lot of

DescendantsEdit