foulard

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French foulard.

PronunciationEdit

 
a foulard petticoat from 1882
  • (UK) IPA(key): /fuːˈlɑːd/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /fuːˈlɑɹd/

NounEdit

foulard (countable and uncountable, plural foulards)

  1. A lightweight silk or silk-and-cotton fabric, often with a printed pattern. [from 19th c.]
    • 1869, Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad:
      The Empress and the little Grand Duchess wore simple suits of foulard (or foulard silk, I don't know which is proper,) with a small blue spot in it []
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 176:
      A lot of foulard tie bulged out and was rain-spotted above his crossed lapels.
  2. A piece of clothing, or a handkerchief, made with this fabric. [from 19th c.]

QuotationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain, perhaps related to fouler.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foulard m (plural foulards)

  1. headscarf

DescendantsEdit

  • English: foulard
  • Italian: foulard
  • Romanian: fular
  • Spanish: fular, foulard

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French foulard.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foulard m (invariable)

  1. foulard
    Synonym: fazzoletto

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ foulard in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French foulard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fuˈlaɾ/, [fuˈlaɾ]

NounEdit

foulard m (plural foulards)

  1. foulard