frigidaire

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proprietary name of a brand of refrigerators.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

frigidaire (plural frigidaires)

  1. (now historical) Trademark for a refrigerator.
    • 1939, W. H. Auden, The Unknown Citizen:
      He [...] had everything necessary to the Modern Man, / A phonograph, a radio, a car and a frigidaire.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XII, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      “Have you seen Kipper?” I wouldn't say she snorted, but she certainly sniffed. “Bertie,” she said in a voice straight from the frigidaire, “will you do me a favour?” “Of course. What?” “Don't mention that rat's name in my presence,” she said, and pushed off, the eyelids still weary.
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Penguin 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 659:
      Carpets were spread, divans appeared, as also the latest creation from Italy, a portable frigidaire which held countless bowls of sorbet and iced lemon tea.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proprietary name, apparently originally based on Latin frigidarium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fʁi.ʒi.dɛʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

frigidaire m (plural frigidaires)

  1. A refrigerator.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit