refrigerator

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From refrigerate +‎ -or

PronunciationEdit

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈfɹɪd͡ʒəˌɹeɪtə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈfɹɪd͡ʒəˌɹeɪɾɚ/, /ɹəˈfɹɪd͡ʒəˌɹeɪɾɚ/
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NounEdit

refrigerator (plural refrigerators)

 
An open refrigerator
  1. A household appliance used for keeping food fresh by refrigeration (short form fridge).
    • 1868, Alcott, Louisa May, Little Women, ch. 11:
      Jo uttered a groan and fell back in her chair, remembering that she had given a last hasty powdering to the berries out of one of the two boxes on the kitchen table, and had neglected to put the milk in the refrigerator.
    • 2013 June 1, “A better waterworks”, in The Economist[1], volume 407, number 8838, page 5 (Technology Quarterly):
      An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic the way real kidneys cleanse blood and eject impurities and surplus water as urine.
  2. A similar device used to keep non-food items cold, such as blood, photographic film, drugs, or pharmaceuticals like insulin.
  3. One who has a chilling influence.
    • 1852-53, Charles Dickens, Bleak House
      [] in a state of sublime satisfaction, he moves among the company, a magnificent refrigerator.

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LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

(Classical) IPA(key): /re.friː.ɡeˈraː.tor/, [rɛfriːɡɛˈräːt̪ɔr]

VerbEdit

refrīgerātor

  1. second/third-person singular future passive imperative of refrīgerō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French réfrigérateur.

NounEdit

refrigerator n (plural refrigeratoare)

  1. refrigerator
    Synonym: frigider

DeclensionEdit