See also: Gager

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

gage +‎ -er

NounEdit

gager (plural gagers)

  1. A measurer.

See alsoEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for gager in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From gage or from Old French guagier, itself from guage or from a derivative of Frankish *waddi, *wadja, possibly through a Vulgar Latin intermediate *wadiare from *wadium. Compare English to wage and wager, which came from the same source via an Anglo-Norman/Old Northern French variant.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gager

  1. to guarantee
  2. to wager or bet

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written gage- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

gager

  1. Alternative form of gauger