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See also: Manger

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A manger

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French mangoire, menjoere, from mangier (to eat) (modern French manger).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

manger (plural mangers)

  1. A trough for animals to eat from.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French manger, from Old French mengier, from Late Latin manducāre (to chew, devour), present active infinitive of manducō, from Latin mandō.

See cognates in regional languages in France : Norman maungi, Gallo mangier, Picard minger, Bourguignon mainjai, Franco-Provençal mengiér, Occitan manjar, Corsican manghjà.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

manger

  1. (transitive) to eat
    J'ai mangé de la viande pour le souper.
    I ate some meat for dinner.
  2. (intransitive) to eat
    C'est bizarre que je ne mange rien.
    It's strange that I don't eat anything.
    Manger au restaurant.
    To eat in a restaurant.

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written mange- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and ranger.

NounEdit

manger m (plural mangers)

  1. food, foodstuff.
    Un manger délicat.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mengier.

VerbEdit

manger

  1. to eat (consume food)

ConjugationEdit

  • As parler except an extra e is inserted after the final g before a and o.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

manger m (plural mangers)

  1. food (comestible solids)

Coordinate termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

manger

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of mengier

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. In addition, g becomes j before an a or an o to keep the /dʒ/ sound intact. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) mangiar

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French mangier, from Latin mandūcō, manducāre.

VerbEdit

manger

  1. (Puter) to eat

Related termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

In standardised Rumantsch Grischun, mangiar is used for people eating and magliar for animals eating. When applied to people magliar means eating badly (eating like a pig). Some of the Romansch lects do not make this distinction (especially Sursilvan) and magliar is the usual term for human beings.