glassen

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English glassen, glasen, from Old English glesen (made of glass), from Proto-West Germanic *glasīn (made of glass; glazen). Equivalent to glass +‎ -en (adjective suffix). Doublet of glazen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡlɑːsən/, /ˈɡlæsən/
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AdjectiveEdit

glassen (comparative more glassen, superlative most glassen)

  1. Made of or consisting of glass.
    • 2012, B. Suchoff, Bela Bartok, Rumanian Folk Music:
      From the castle calls Ileana, Refrain (Looking) through the glassen windows, (Looking) through the glassen windows: []
    • 2013, Allen G. Debus, The Chemical Philosophy:
      But I had a glassen vessel, of a narrow neck, weighing 1354 grains: []
  2. Resembling glass; glassy; glazed.
    • 1640 (first published), Ben Jonson, An Epistle to a friend to persuade him to join the wars
      And pursues the dice with glassen eyes.
    • 2004, John Coulson Tregarthen, John Penrose: A Romance of the Land's End:
      Abreast of the players, he jumped down, seized one of the taws - it was a glassen alley - knuckled down, fired kibby at the clayers in the ring, and was back in his seat before you could cry "Jack Robinson".
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From glass +‎ -en (verbal suffix).

VerbEdit

glassen (third-person singular simple present glassens, present participle glassening, simple past and past participle glassened)

  1. (transitive) To coat or cover (e.g. pottery, etc.) with glaze; make glassy.
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glassen

  1. Alternative form of glasen

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

glassen

  1. definite singular of glass.

AnagramsEdit