Contents

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

to go in for ‎(third-person singular simple present goes in for, present participle going in for, simple past went in for, past participle gone in for)

  1. To enter a competition.
  2. (colloquial) To have an interest in or approve of something.
    • 2016, Mary Lasswell, Let's Go For Broke[1]:
      “I hope she doesn't go in for big purple orchids,” Miss Tinkham said to Mrs. Rasmussen, “there are so many pretty kinds.”
  3. (colloquial) To engage oneself or take part in something.
    • Charles Dickens
      He was as ready to go in for statistics as for anything else.
    • 1979, Edmund Wilson, American Earthquake[2]:
      "Why on earth do you go in for track?" I asked him. And then he explained that he thought that, if you wanted to be an all-around man, you ought to cultivate some form of athletics— he's actually taken up pole-vaulting: isn't that a ghastly thought?
    • 2002, Margaret Oliphant, Phoebe Junior[3], page 270:
      It ain't their fault; I know heaps of nice girls who feel it horribly. What can they do? they can't go in for cricket and football.

ReferencesEdit

  • go in for” in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • go in for” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • "go in for" on UsingEnglish.com

AnagramsEdit