guardant

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French guardant, present participle of guarder.

AdjectiveEdit

guardant (not comparable)

  1. (heraldry, of an animal) Positioned with the body viewed from the side, but with the head turned toward the viewer

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

guardant (plural guardants)

  1. (obsolete) A guardian.
    • 1591 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Sixt”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
      But when my angry guardant stood alone, / Tendering my ruin and assail'd of none, / Dizzy-eyed fury and great rage of heart / Suddenly made him from my side to start / Into the clustering battle of the French.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for guardant in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

guardant

  1. present participle of guardar

Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

guardant (feminine singular guardante, masculine plural guardans, feminine plural guardantes)

  1. present participle of guarder
  2. (may be preceded by en, invariable) gerund of guarder

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

guardant

  1. present participle of guarder