See also: i̱kinꞌ and Ikin

Salar

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Etymology

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From Salar ekgüsi + -in. Cognate to Azerbaijani əkin, Gagauz and Turkish ekin, Turkmen ekin.

Pronunciation

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  • (Hualong, Xunhua, Qinghai, Ili, Xinjiang) IPA(key): /ixin/
  • (Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): /exen/

Noun

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ikin

  1. (agriculture) crop (anything that is planted for its yield)

Derived terms

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References

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  • 林 (Lin), 莲云 (Lianyun) (1992) “ikin”, in 撒拉汉汉撒拉词汇 [Salar-Chinese, Chinese-Salar Vocabulary], 成都: 四川民族出版社, →ISBN, page 7
  • Ma, Chengjun, Han, Lianye, Ma, Weisheng (December 2010) “ikin”, in 米娜瓦尔 艾比布拉 (Minavar Abibra), editor, 撒维汉词典 (Sāwéihàncídiǎn) [Salar-Uyghur-Chinese dictionary], 1st edition, Beijing, →ISBN, page 143
  • 马伟 (Ma Wei), 朝克 (Chao Ke) (2016) “ikin”, in 濒危语言——撒拉语研究 [Endangered Languages ​​- Salar Language Studies], 青海 (Qinghai): 国家社会科学基金项目 (National Social Science Foundation Project), page 267

Yoruba

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Ikin

Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ikin

  1. sacred palm nuts that are used as divination tools in the consulting of Ifa by babalawos. The using of the ikin is reserved for highly important ceremonies (such as during a Àkọsẹ̀jayé) and is how priests determine the signature of an odù Ifá.
    • The ọ̀pẹ̀lẹ̀ and ẹ̀rìndínlógún both serve similar purposes, with the ọ̀pẹ̀lẹ̀ being used for less formal situations and the ẹ̀rìndínlógún being used by aborisha that are not initiated into Ifá.
Derived terms
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  • Ṣọ́kinlójú (A Yoruba chieftancy title whose responsibility it is to keeps a close watch on the ikin)

Etymology 2

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Ikín

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ikín

  1. The plant Megathyrsus maximus
    Synonym: ikín ìrùkẹ̀
    Synonym: ikín ẹṣin