imperturbable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French imperturbable, from Late Latin imperturbābilis, from im- + perturbō + -bilis. Surface analysis im- + perturbable.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

imperturbable (comparative more imperturbable, superlative most imperturbable)

  1. Not easily perturbed, upset or excited.
    • 1962 August, G. Freeman Allen, “Traffic control on the Great Northern Line”, in Modern Railways, page 132:
      This sort of thing is meat and drink to the born Controller—and Controllers are born with the right imperturbable temperament for the job; hence the fact that they are recruited from many different grades of operating staff, and some recruits don't stay the course.
  2. Calm and collected, even under pressure.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin imperturbābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

imperturbable (plural imperturbables)

  1. imperturbable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin imperturbābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

imperturbable m or f (plural imperturbables)

  1. imperturbable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin imperturbābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

imperturbable m (feminine singular imperturbabla, masculine plural imperturbables, feminine plural imperturbablas)

  1. imperturbable

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin imperturbābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

imperturbable (plural imperturbables)

  1. imperturbable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit