inauspicious

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ auspicious

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪnɔːˈspɪʃəs/
    • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

inauspicious (comparative more inauspicious, superlative most inauspicious)

  1. Not auspicious; ill-omened
    Synonyms: unfortunate, unlucky, unfavorable
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, V,iii.
      And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars.
    • 1685, John Dryden, The Despairing Lover
      Inauspicious love.
    • 1788, John Jay, as Publius, The Federalist, II
      It is not to be wondered at that a government instituted in times so inauspicious, should on experiment be found greatly deficient and inadequate to the purpose it was intended to answer.
    • 2020 August 12, “Network News: Triple failure of Class 745s on first day of Stansted services”, in Rail, page 17:
      Class 745/1s suffered an inauspicious entry into traffic on the Stansted Express route on July 28, when the two units supplied (745103/106) both failed, as did a train sent to cover them (745108).

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