EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English in-, from Old English in- (in, into, prefix), from Proto-Germanic *in, from Proto-Indo-European *en. More at in.

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in, into, towards, within.
    inhold, inmove, intake, inthrill
    inborn, inbound
    infield, infighting, insight, intalk, inwork
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
terms derived from in-: toward
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English in-, borrowed (in words of Latinate origin) from Latin in-, from Latin in, from Proto-Indo-European *en (cognate to Germanic in-, above). Often borrowed from French in- (e.g. incise, incite, incline, indication), or as French en-, originally from Latin in.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in, into
    Note: Before certain letters, in- becomes:
Usage notesEdit

In direction sense, used in Latinate terms, and opposed by ex-, e-, rather than Germanic out-; senses not always strict antonyms. Examples include infiltrate/exfiltrate, ingress/egress, invade/evade.

AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
terms derived from in-: direction
terms derived from in-: tendency

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English in-, borrowed (in words of latinate origin) from Latin in- (not). Sometimes the Latin word has passed through French before reaching English (e.g. incapable, incertainty, inclement, incompatible). Compare un-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. (non-productive) Used with certain words to reverse their meaning
    Note: Before certain letters, in- becomes:
    1. (non-productive) Added to adjectives to mean not
      inedible
      inaccurate
    2. (non-productive) Added to nouns to mean lacking or without
      incredulity
      ineptitude
Derived termsEdit
terms derived from in-: reversing meaning
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin in- (un-, not).

PrefixEdit

in- (before l il-, before b, m, or p im-, before r ir-)

  1. in- ; un- (reversal of meaning or lack of an attribute)

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. from the adverb in
  2. prepended to a noun or adjective, it reinforces the quality signified thereby
  3. prepended to an adjective to negate its meaning; occurs mostly in borrowed terms from French: in-, un-

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin in- (un-, not).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (before a consonant) /ɛ̃/, (before a vowel) /in/

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in-; un- (indicates negation)

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin in-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in-; un- (indicates negation)
    in- + ‎homogen (homogenous) → ‎inhomogen (inhomogeneous)

Etymology 2Edit

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *in, from Proto-Indo-European *en. More at in.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. (rare, not productive) in; into (nominal equivalent to ein-)
    in- + ‎Schrift (writing) → ‎Inschrift (inscription)
    in- + ‎Sasse (someone who sits) → ‎Insasse (passenger, inhabitant)
    in- + ‎Begriff (concept) → ‎Inbegriff (embodiment)

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Latin in-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. (not productive) in-, into
    in- + ‎filtrieren (to filter) → ‎infiltrieren (to infiltrate)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • in- in Duden online
  • in-” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

in-

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌽-

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. capable of, fit for, fit to be
    Antonym: do-

Etymology 2Edit

From i, in (in).

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. en-, in-, il-, im-, ir-
  2. endo-
  3. intra-
Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
in- n-in- hin- t-in-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "in-" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “in-” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • im- (assimilated form before b-/m-/p-)
  • il- (assimilated form before l-)
  • ir- (assimilated form before r-)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin in-, a prefixation of in (in, into), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. (forms verbs) Used to denote derivation.
  2. (obsolete, rare) Used as an intensifier.
Usage notesEdit
  • The prefix is used together with a verbal ending suffix to derive causative verbs from adjectives or nouns:
Examples:
in- + ‎arido (dry”, “arid) → ‎inaridire (to parch”, “to dry up)
in- + ‎fiamma (flame) → ‎infiammare (to enflame”, “to kindle)
  • When used with verbs, it's usually a reflection of derivation in Latin, and retains the original meaning of “into”, “inside”:
Example:
in- + ‎fondere → ‎infondere (to infuse”, “to instill) (cfr. Latin īnfundere)
  • In some cases, the meaning of “into” can also be found in verbs of modern derivation:
Example:
in- + ‎carcere (jail”, “prison) → ‎incarcerare (to imprison”, “to incarcerate)

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin in- (un-, not), from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-, zero grade form of the sentence negative *ne.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. Used to denote negation or opposition or privation; un-; in-; a-
Usage notesEdit
  • The suffix is usually found in adjectives (and nouns therefrom derived):
Examples:
in- + ‎coerente (coherent”, “consistent) → ‎incoerente (incoherent”, “inconsistent)
in- + ‎abile (able”, “capable) → ‎inabile (unable”, “incapable)
in- + ‎felice (happy) → ‎infelice (unhappy)
in- + ‎desiderabile (desirable; advisable) → ‎indesiderabile (undesirable, unwelcome)
  • More rarely, it is found in adjectives derived from nouns:
Example:
in- + ‎colore (colour) → ‎incolore (uncoloured)

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *en-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥- (not), zero-grade form of the negative particle *ne (not). Akin to ne-, , .

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. un-, non-, not
Usage notesEdit

Affixed primarily to adjectives.

The spelling of the prefix changes in some situations:

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Catalan: in- (sometimes i-, or im- before p, b and m)
  • French: in-
  • Italian: in-
  • Middle English: in-
  • Portuguese: in-, im- before p, b and m)
  • Spanish: in- (sometimes i-, or im- before p, b and m)

Etymology 2Edit

Prefixation of in.

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in, within, inside
Usage notesEdit

Affixed primarily to verbs.

Not to be confused with in- (not).

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • in- in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 301

MalteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

in-

  1. Alternative form of il-

Usage notesEdit

  • Used before the letter n. For details on usage, see the main lemma.

Northern NdebeleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nguni *ín-, from Proto-Bantu *jɪ̀-n-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. Class 9 noun prefix.

Usage notesEdit

The variant form im- is used before stems beginning with a labial consonant (b, f, m, p, v).


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈin/ (as a nominal prefix)
  • IPA(key): /in/ (as a verbal prefix)

Etymology 1Edit

From in (in). More at in.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in, into; on, upon
    in- + ‎blāwan (to blow; to breathe) → ‎inblāwan (to inspire, breathe upon)
    in- + ‎ēodan → ‎inēodan (to enter)
    in- + ‎ēþung → ‎inēþung (inspiration)
  2. internal, positioned on the inside, inside
    in- + ‎coþu (disease, sickness) → ‎incoþu (internal disease)
    in- + ‎dryhten (lord) → ‎indryhten (distinguished, noble, courtly, excellent)
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: in-

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *in- (strong, adj), from Proto-Indo-European *indʰro- (swelling; strong), from *oyd- (to swell).

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. (intensifying) very
    in- + ‎frōd (wise) → ‎infrōd (very old, experienced, wise)
    in- + ‎dryhten (noble) → ‎indryhten (very noble)

Derived termsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *eni-. Prefix form of i. Conflated with ind- quite early.

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. in

Usage notesEdit

Very frequently replaced by ad- in pretonic position in verbs where the meaning ‘in’ is not transparent, e.g.:

Sometimes replaced by as- in pretonic position in verbs where the meaning ‘in’ is not transparent, e.g.:

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PrefixEdit

in- (class C infixed pronoun)

  1. Alternative form of id-

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • im- (before p or b)
  • ir- (before r)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin in- (un-, not).

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. un-; not

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin in- (un-, not).

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. not (negation)

Derived termsEdit


SwaziEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nguni *ín-, from Proto-Bantu *jɪ̀-n-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. Class 9 noun prefix.

Usage notesEdit

The variant form im- is used before stems beginning with a labial consonant (b, f, m, p, v).


XhosaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nguni *ín-, from Proto-Bantu *jɪ̀-n-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. Class 9 noun prefix.

Usage notesEdit

The variant form im- is used before stems beginning with a labial consonant (b, f, m, p, v).


ZuluEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nguni *ín-, from Proto-Bantu *jɪ̀-n-.

PrefixEdit

in-

  1. Class 9 noun prefix.

Usage notesEdit

The variant form im- is used before stems beginning with a labial consonant (b, f, m, p, v). Before l, m or n, the prefix becomes i-.

ReferencesEdit