infangthief

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English infangthef, from Old English infangeneþēof ‎(infangthief), from in- + fangen ‎(siezed, taken) + þēof ‎(thief). See also infang.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnfæŋθiːf/

NounEdit

infangthief

  1. (historical, law) A privilege of some feudal lords permitting them to execute summary judgment upon thieves captured within their estates, sometimes restricted to the lord's tenants or men and sometimes limited to those caught in flagrante delicto.
    • 1964, Anthony Burgess, The Eve of St Venus:
      The wrought-iron gates (infangthief and outfangthief in heavy balls on the gate-posts) were open for their hard-breathing entry.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "infangthief, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1900.