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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English men, from Old English menn (men, people, human beings collectively), From Proto-Germanic *manniz, nominative plural of Proto-Germanic *mann- (human; man). Cognate with German Männer (men), Danish mænd (men), Swedish män (men). More at man.

PronunciationEdit

 
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A group of men sitting together.

NounEdit

men

  1. plural form of man
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. [] Indeed, all his features were in large mold, like the man himself, as though he had come from a day when skin garments made the proper garb of men.
  2. (collective) (The) people, humanity.

QuotationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


BasqueEdit

NounEdit

men

  1. A command

ChuukeseEdit

AdverbEdit

men

  1. softer form of fakkun (very)

Crimean TatarEdit

PronounEdit

men (plural biz, possessive adjective menim)

  1. (personal) I (first-person singular)

InflectionEdit

object me: maña
reflexive myself: özüm
possessive mine, my: menim

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mein, from Proto-Germanic *mainą (damage, hurt, injustice, sin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

men or mén n, c (singular definite menet or menen, plural indefinite men, plural definite menene)

  1. injury

Etymology 2Edit

Same origin as Old Norse meðan (while).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

men

  1. but
  2. (as a noun) but, catch, hitch, snag
    Jeg kan høre, der er et men.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch men. An unstressed variety of man. Compare Middle English men (indefinite pronoun).

PronounEdit

men

  1. (indefinite) One, they, (the) people; indefinite third-person singular pronoun: Men zegt dat... (People say that...; It is said that...)
  2. All humanity, everyone; public opinion.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

origin unclear

VerbEdit

men

  1. first-person singular present indicative of mennen
  2. imperative of mennen

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

men f (genitive singular menar, plural menir or menar)

  1. (rare, Mykines) The spinal cord

DeclensionEdit

Declension of men
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative men menin menir menirnar
accusative men menina menir menirnar
dative men menini menum menunum
genitive menar menarinnar mena menanna
f6 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative men menin menar menarnar
Accusative men menina menar menarnar
Dative men menini menum menunum
Genitive menar menarinnar mena menanna

SynonymsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

men

  1. but

Haitian CreoleEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French main (hand)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

men

  1. hand

Etymology 2Edit

From French mais (but).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

men

  1. but

ItalianEdit

AdverbEdit

men

  1. Apocopic form of meno

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

men

  1. Rōmaji transcription of めん

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

men

  1. rafsi of menli.

MacaguánEdit

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

men (Zhuyin ㄇㄣ˙)

  1. Pinyin transcription of ,
  2. Nonstandard spelling of mēn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of mén.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of měn.
  5. Nonstandard spelling of mèn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

An unstressed variety of man.

PronounEdit

men

  1. someone
  2. one, they, you, people; impersonal pronoun.

InflectionEdit

This pronoun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: men
  • Limburgish: me

Further readingEdit

  • men”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • men (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Via Swedish and Danish men, same origin as Old Norse meðan (while).

ConjunctionEdit

men

  1. But, however; introducing a clause that contrasts with the preceding clause, sentence or common belief.
  2. though
  3. only
    Han er en fin kar, men han snakker litt for mye. – He is a nice guy, but he talks a bit too much.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mein.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

men

  1. damage; injury (also mén)
  2. permanent disability
  3. difficulty; drawback

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

men

  1. imperative of mene

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Via Swedish and Danish men, same origin as Old Norse meðan (while).

ConjunctionEdit

men

  1. but, however; introducing a clause that contrasts with the preceding clause, sentence or common belief.
  2. though
  3. only

Etymology 2Edit

From men.

NounEdit

men n (definite singular menet, uncountable)

  1. difficulty

NovialEdit

DeterminerEdit

men

  1. my

PronounEdit

men

  1. mine

Related termsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *manją. Cognate with Old English mene.

NounEdit

men n (genitive mens, plural men)

  1. necklace

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


PohnpeianEdit

VerbEdit

men

  1. to want

SherbroEdit

NounEdit

men (plural menti)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) water

ReferencesEdit

  • James Frederick Schön, James Frederick Schön, Sherbro Vocabulary (1839), page 24

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

men m pl

  1. plural of man

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish men, from Middle Low German men, man (but, only), probably from Old Saxon niwan; possibly under the influence of Old Swedish men (while, during) (modern Swedish medan, medans, mens). Cognate with modern Low German man.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

men

  1. but; introducing a clause that contrasts with the preceding clause, sentence or common belief.
  2. yet, but, however
    John har bott i staden i fem år, men aldrig besökt slottet.
    John has lived in the city for five years, yet never visited the castle.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mein, like Icelandic mein, Norwegian mein, Old Saxon mēn, Old English mān; cognate with Icelandic meinn (which causes injury), Old English mǣne (evil, deceptive, adj), Lithuanian maĭnas (change, noun), Proto-Slavic *měna (change, noun); from the Proto-Indo-European root *mei- (to switch).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

men n

  1. a handicap, long-time remnant of a physical or mental injury, which affects a person negatively
DeclensionEdit
Declension of men 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative men menet men menen
Genitive mens menets mens menens
Related termsEdit

TurkmenEdit

PronounEdit

men

  1. (personal) I

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *-mɛːn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

men

  1. yeast

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

men

  1. human / man (male or female)), human being

HyponymsEdit