See also: LORD, Lord, Lords, and Lord's

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Wikiquote

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English lord and lorde (attested from the 15th century), from earlier (14th century) lourde and other variants which dropped the intervocalic consonant of earlier lowerd, louerd, loverd, laford, and lhoaverd; from Old English hlāford < hlāfweard, a compound of hlāf (bread) + weard (guardian); see loaf and ward. The term was already being applied broadly prior to the literary development of Old English and was influenced by its common use to translate Latin dominus. Compare Scots laird (lord), preserving a separate vowel development (from northern/Scottish Middle English lard, laverd), the Old English compound hlāf-ǣta (servant, literally bread-eater), and modern English lady, from Old English hlǣfdīġe (bread-kneader).[1] The Middle English word laford was borrowed by Icelandic, where it survives as lávarður.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lord (plural lords)

  1. (obsolete) The master of the servants of a household; (historical) the master of a feudal manor
    1. (archaic) The male head of a household, a father or husband.
    2. (archaic) The owner of a house, piece of land, or other possession
      • ante 1300, Cursor Mundi, 601 f.
        Als oure lauerd has heuen in hand
        Sua suld man be lauerd of land.
      • 1480, Waterford Archives in the 10th Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts (1885), App. v. 316
        All suche lordes as have gutters betuxte thar houses.
      • ante 1637, Ben Jonson, Sad Shepherd, ii. i. 36
        A mightie Lord of Swine!
      • 1697, John Dryden translating Publius Virgilius Maro's Æneis, xii
        Turnus...
        Wrench'd from his feeble hold the shining Sword;
        And plung'd it in the Bosom of its Lord.
      • 1874, J. H. Collins, Principles of Metal Mining (1875), Gloss. 139/2
        Lord, the owner of the land in which a mine is situated is called the ‘lord’.
  2. One possessing similar mastery over others; (historical) any feudal superior generally; any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler; in Scotland, a male member of the lowest rank of nobility (the equivalent rank in England is baron)
    1. (historical) A feudal tenant holding his manor directly of the king
    2. A peer of the realm, particularly a temporal one
    3. (obsolete, uncommon) A baron or lesser nobleman, as opposed to greater ones
      • 1526, W. Bonde, Pylgrimage of Perfection, i. sig. Bviiiv
        Farre excellyng the state of lordes, erles, dukes or kynges.
      • 1826, Benjamin Disraeli, Vivian Grey, II. iii. iii. 26
        The Marquess played off the two Lords and the Baronet against his former friend.
  3. One possessing similar mastery in figurative senses (esp. as lord of ~)
    • ante 1300, Cursor Mundi, 782
      O wityng bath god and ill Ȝee suld be lauerds at ȝour will.
    • 1398, John Trevisa translating Bartholomew de Glanville's De Proprietatibus Rerum (1495), viii. xvi. 322
      The sonne is the lorde of planetes.
    • 1697, John Dryden translating Publius Virgilius Maro as Georgics, iii
      Love is Lord of all.
    • 1895, Kenneth Graham, The Golden Age, London, page 8:
      The masterful wind was up and out, shouting and chasing, the lord of the morning.
    • 1992 November 18, Larry David, Seinfeld, 4.11: "The Contest":
      But are you still master of your domain?
      I am king of the county. You?
      Lord of the manor.
    1. A magnate of a trade or profession.
      The Tobacco Lords were a group of Scottish merchants and slave traders who in the 18th century made enormous fortunes by trading in tobacco.
      • 1823, W. Cobbett, Rural Rides (1885), I. 399
        Oh, Oh! The cotton Lords are tearing!
  4. (astrology) The heavenly body considered to possess a dominant influence over an event, time, etc.
  5. (Britain, slang, obsolete) A hunchback.
    • 1699, B.E., A new dictionary of the terms ancient and modern of the canting crew:
      Lord, a very crooked, deformed... Person.
  6. (Britain, Australia, via Cockney rhyming slang, obsolete) Sixpence.
    • 1933 November 16, Times Literary Supplement, 782/1:
      Twenty years ago you might hear a sixpence described as a ‘Lord’ meaning ‘Lord of the Manor’; that is, a tanner.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Belizean Creole: laad
  • Bengali: লাট (laṭ)
  • Faroese: lordur
  • Gullah: lawd
  • Hungarian: lord
  • Italian: lord
  • Jamaican Creole: lord
  • Pijin: lod
  • Portuguese: lorde
  • Russian: ло́рд (lórd)
  • Serbo-Croatian: lȍrd / ло̏рд
  • Spanish: lord
  • Torres Strait Creole: lod
  • Turkish: lord
  • Yiddish: לאָרד(lord)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

lord (third-person singular simple present lords, present participle lording, simple past and past participle lorded)

  1. (intransitive and transitive) Domineer or act like a lord.
  2. (transitive) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord; to grant the title of lord.
    • c. 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 2:
      He being thus lorded / Not only with what my revenue yielded, / But what my power might else exact, [] / he did believe / He was indeed the Duke

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lord in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • lord at OneLook Dictionary Search
  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "lord, n.". Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1903.

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lord

  1. indefinite accusative singular of lordur

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English lord.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lord (plural lordok)

  1. lord (English nobleman or aristocrat)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative lord lordok
accusative lordot lordokat
dative lordnak lordoknak
instrumental lorddal lordokkal
causal-final lordért lordokért
translative lorddá lordokká
terminative lordig lordokig
essive-formal lordként lordokként
essive-modal
inessive lordban lordokban
superessive lordon lordokon
adessive lordnál lordoknál
illative lordba lordokba
sublative lordra lordokra
allative lordhoz lordokhoz
elative lordból lordokból
delative lordról lordokról
ablative lordtól lordoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
lordé lordoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
lordéi lordokéi
Possessive forms of lord
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. lordom lordjaim
2nd person sing. lordod lordjaid
3rd person sing. lordja lordjai
1st person plural lordunk lordjaink
2nd person plural lordotok lordjaitok
3rd person plural lordjuk lordjaik

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • lord in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English lord.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lord m (invariable)

  1. lord (British aristocrat)
  2. gentleman

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ lord in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hlāford, hlāfweard, in turn from hlāf (bread, loaf) + weard (ward, guardian, keeper).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lɔːrd/
  • (Early ME) IPA(key): /ˈlɔːwərd/, /ˈlɔːvərd/

NounEdit

lord (plural lordes)

  1. lord (important man)
  2. Lord (title of God)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English lord.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lȍrd m (Cyrillic spelling ло̏рд)

  1. lord (British title)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lord” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English lord.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈloɾd/, [ˈloɾð̞]

NounEdit

lord m (plural lores)

  1. lord (British title)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English lord.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɫoɾd]
  • Hyphenation: lord

NounEdit

lord (definite accusative lordu, plural lordlar)

  1. lord
    Hypernym: asilzade

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative lord
Definite accusative lordu
Singular Plural
Nominative lord lordlar
Definite accusative lordu lordları
Dative lorda lordlara
Locative lordda lordlarda
Ablative lorddan lordlardan
Genitive lordun lordların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular lordum lordlarım
2nd singular lordun lordların
3rd singular lordu lordları
1st plural lordumuz lordlarımız
2nd plural lordunuz lordlarınız
3rd plural lordları lordları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular lordumu lordlarımı
2nd singular lordunu lordlarını
3rd singular lordunu lordlarını
1st plural lordumuzu lordlarımızı
2nd plural lordunuzu lordlarınızı
3rd plural lordlarını lordlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular lorduma lordlarıma
2nd singular lorduna lordlarına
3rd singular lorduna lordlarına
1st plural lordumuza lordlarımıza
2nd plural lordunuza lordlarınıza
3rd plural lordlarına lordlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular lordumda lordlarımda
2nd singular lordunda lordlarında
3rd singular lordunda lordlarında
1st plural lordumuzda lordlarımızda
2nd plural lordunuzda lordlarınızda
3rd plural lordlarında lordlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular lordumdan lordlarımdan
2nd singular lordundan lordlarından
3rd singular lordundan lordlarından
1st plural lordumuzdan lordlarımızdan
2nd plural lordunuzdan lordlarınızdan
3rd plural lordlarından lordlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular lordumun lordlarımın
2nd singular lordunun lordlarının
3rd singular lordunun lordlarının
1st plural lordumuzun lordlarımızın
2nd plural lordunuzun lordlarınızın
3rd plural lordlarının lordlarının