Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

inform +‎ -ed

VerbEdit

informed

  1. simple past tense and past participle of inform

AdjectiveEdit

informed (comparative more informed, superlative most informed)

  1. Instructed; having knowledge of a fact or area of education.
    An informed young man delivered a lecture on the history of modern art.
  2. Based on knowledge; founded on due understanding of a situation.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 696:
      Another informed and sobering estimate is that by 1800 indigenous populations in the western hemisphere were a tenth of what they had been three centuries before.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

in- +‎ formed the first sense probably uses in- (in), the second sense uses in- (prefix of negation).

AdjectiveEdit

informed (comparative more informed, superlative most informed)

  1. (obsolete) Created, given form.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.vi:
      after Nilus invndation, / Infinite shapes of creatures men do fynd, / Informed in the mud, on which the Sunne hath shynd.
  2. (obsolete) unformed or ill-formed; deformed; shapeless
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (astronomy, obsolete) Not included within the figures of any of the ancient constellations.
    the informed stars

AnagramsEdit