See also: inne, -inne, and iňňe

French edit

Etymology edit

A semi-learned term borrowed from Latin innātus (inborn), perfect active participle of innāscor (be born in, grow up in), from in (in, at on) + nāscor (be born). Replaced the inherited Old French form enné.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /i(n).ne/
  • (file)

Adjective edit

inné (feminine innée, masculine plural innés, feminine plural innées)

  1. innate, inborn, congenital, inbred, native
    Antonym: acquis

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish indé.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

inné

  1. yesterday

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 indé”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 19
  3. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 98
  4. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 90

Further reading edit

Sassarese edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

inné

  1. Used to indicate the house, place, or establishment of; at or to + -'s
    Soggu inné PàuruI'm at Paul’s

References edit

  • Rubattu, Antoninu (2006) Dizionario universale della lingua di Sardegna, 2nd edition, Sassari: Edes