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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

inside +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

insider (plural insiders)

  1. A person who has special knowledge about the inner workings of a group, organization, or institution.
    • 1923, "‘Big Board’ Failures," Time, 2 Jul.,
      Heavy losses were sustained in Simms Petroleum, which took a greater toll from supposed "Wall Street insiders" than from the general public.
    • 2007, Jonathan Clayton, "Profile: Zuma charmed wives and a nation," Times of London (UK), 19 Dec.,
      He is also an astute ANC insider who spent ten years on Robben Island alongside Nelson Mandela and the other “grandees” of the movement.
    • 2018 July 31, Julia Carrie Wong, “What is QAnon? Explaining the bizarre rightwing conspiracy theory”, in The Guardian[1]:
      In a thread called “Calm Before the Storm”, and in subsequent posts, Q established his legend as a government insider with top security clearance who knew the truth about a secret struggle for power involving Donald Trump, the “deep state”, Robert Mueller, the Clintons, pedophile rings, and other stuff.
  2. A person who is within an enclosed space.
    • 1849, Herman Melville, Redburn: His First Voyage, ch. 33,
      To the insider, the ceiling is like a small firmament twinkling with astral radiations.

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