SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *iuxtāre, from Latin iuxtā (near, beside). Probably arrived through the intermediate of Old Occitan jostar (and later influenced by justo) or Catalan justar. As it was a term relating to chivalry and knighthood, it may have been treated or seen as foreign, or it may have been influenced by Gallo-Romance languages[1]. Compare Catalan justar, French jouter, Italian giostrare. Cf. also ayustar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xusˈtaɾ/, [xusˈt̪aɾ]

VerbEdit

justar (first-person singular present justo, first-person singular preterite justé, past participle justado)

  1. (intransitive) to joust

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from justo. Compare Italian aggiustare

VerbEdit

justar

  1. (transitive) to repair, mend
  2. (transitive) to adjust

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.