kolovrat

See also: Kolovrat

EnglishEdit

Two variants of the kolovrat symbol.

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Slavic *kolovortъ. In historical records, similar symbols were recorded as ладинец (ladinec) in Russian or słoneczko in Polish.

This spelling was influenced by Russian коловра́т (kolovrát), the more well-known form of the symbol invented by the neo-pagan leader Alexey Dobrovolsky in the 1990s.

NounEdit

kolovrat (plural kolovrats)

  1. (paganism, politics, fascism, nationalism) An eight-spoked swastika used by Slavic neopagan, fascist, and nationalist groups.
    • 2009, George McKay; Michael Goddard; Christopher Williams; Neil Foxlee, editors, Subcultures and New Religious Movements in Russia and East-Central Europe, Peter Lang, →ISBN, page 284:
      In contrast, Krasnodar respondents were keen to differentiate between the kolovrat and the swastika, while recognizing the symbolic connections between them: []

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Old Czech kolovrat, from Proto-Slavic *kolovortъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kolovrat m inan

  1. spinning wheel (device for spinning thread with a wheel and a spindle)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • kolovrat in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • kolovrat in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Serbo-CroatianEdit

 
Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *kolovortъ; equivalent to kolo (wheel) +‎ vrat (neck).

NounEdit

kȍlovrȃt m (Cyrillic spelling ко̏ловра̑т)

  1. spinning wheel
  2. whirlpool

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

kȍlovrȃt (Cyrillic spelling ко̏ловра̑т)

  1. precipitously, head over heels

ReferencesEdit

  • kolovrat” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • Pero Budmani, editor (1898-1903), “kȍlovrȃt”, in Rječnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika (in Serbo-Croatian), volume 5, Zagreb: JAZU, page 216