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See also: Laura

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EnglishEdit

 
A laura (cluster of caves for hermits)
 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Late Latin laura, from Ancient Greek the λαύρα (laúra, lane, path).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

laura (plural lauras or laurae)

  1. (historical, Roman Catholic Church) A number of hermitages or cells in the same neighborhood occupied by anchorites who were under the same superior
    • 1864, Charles Kingsley, Lecture IX: The Monk a Civilizer, The Roman and the Teuton: A Series of Lectures Delivered Before the University of Cambridge, page 240,
      The solitaries of the Thebaid found that they became selfish wild beasts, or went mad, if they remained alone; and they formed themselves into lauras, 'lanes' of huts, convents, under a common abbot or father.
  2. (historical, Eastern Orthodox Church) A cluster of cells or caves for hermits, with a church and sometimes a refectory at the centre.
    • 1966, E. C. Butler, Chapter XVIII: Monasticism, H. M. Gwatkin, J. P. Whitney (editors), The Cambridge Medieval History, Volume 1, page 529,
      There were the cenobia, or monasteries proper, where the life was according to the lines laid down by St Basil; and there were the lauras, wherein a semi-eremitical life was followed, the monks living in separate huts within the enclosure.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

laura

  1. third-person singular past historic of laurer

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
laura flōrēns
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NounEdit

laura f (genitive laurae); first declension

  1. Egyptian rue (Ruta angustifolia)
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Apuleius to this entry?)
DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative laura laurae
genitive laurae laurārum
dative laurae laurīs
accusative lauram laurās
ablative laurā laurīs
vocative laura laurae

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the Ancient Greek λαύρα (laúra).

NounEdit

laura f (genitive laurae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) monastery, convent, laura
DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative laura laurae
genitive laurae laurārum
dative laurae laurīs
accusative lauram laurās
ablative laurā laurīs
vocative laura laurae
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • laura in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Laura” on page 404 of Domenico Magri’s Hierolexicon, ſive Sacrum Dictionarium (editio omnium recentissima, augmented by Stefano Sciugliaga, 1765)