EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1750, from Medieval Latin leudēs pl (vassals or followers of the king), from Frankish *liudi (people), from Proto-Germanic *liudiz (people), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁léwdʰis (man, people). Cognate with Old High German liuti (people, subordinates), Gothic *𐌻𐌹𐌿𐌸𐍃 (*liuþs), Old English lēod (chief, man). More at lede and leod.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leud (plural leuds or leudes)

  1. (historical) A vassal or tenant in the early Middle Ages. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
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SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leud

  1. Alternative form of lewed

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

leud m (genitive singular leòid, plural leudan)

  1. breadth, width

Derived termsEdit