EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English leod (people), from Old English lēode ("people, men"; plural of lēod (person, man)), from Proto-Germanic *liudīz (people), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lewdʰ- (man, people). Cognate with Scots lede (people), West Frisian lie (people), Dutch lieden (people) and Dutch lui(den) (people), German Leute (people), Norwegian lyd (people), Polish lud (people), Russian люди (ljudi, people).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leod (plural leod or leods)

  1. (collectively, obsolete) People, folk.
  2. (obsolete) A people, nation, people group.
  3. (obsolete) A man, person.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English lēod "people"

NounEdit

leod (plural ledes)

  1. people
  2. nation; a nation
  3. a man
  4. a serf or tenant
    lige leode ("feudal retainers") --Piers Plowman

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Closely related to lēode and lēodan. From Proto-Germanic *liudiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lewdʰ- (men, people). Cognates include Old High German liut, Old Norse ljōðr, and West Frisian -lju; and, outside the Germanic languages, Lithuanian liáudis (common people), Proto-Slavic *ľudъ (Russian люд (ljud)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lēod m

  1. man, chief, leader
  2. (poetic) a prince
  3. a fine for slaying a man, wergild

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

lēod f

  1. a people, people group, nation
    lēodbealunational tragedy, calamity to a people
    lēodgryregeneral terror
    lēodrihtlaw of the land
    lēodweardgovernment
    lēodhatatyrant
  2. (in compounds) one's own people; home
    lēodbyġentraffic in one's own compatriots, slave trade
    lēodwynnjoy of home
    lēodhwætbrave, valliant
  3. Alternative form of lēode

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit