See also: LEDE, ledě, and leđe

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lede, leode (man; human being, person; lord, prince; God; sir; group, kind; race; a people, nation; human race; land, real property) [and other forms],[1] from three closely related words:

Lēod is derived from Proto-West Germanic *liud(i), from Proto-Germanic *liudiz (man; person; men; people), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁léwdʰis (man, people), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lewdʰ- (to grow; people).[2]

NounEdit

lede (plural lede)

  1. (obsolete) A man; a person.
Usage notesEdit

In modern English, the word is only found as a conscious archaism.

Alternative formsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
The lede of this article entitled “A prominent physician is charged with manslaughter” from The Tacoma Times (Tacoma, Washington, USA, 11 May 1904) is its first paragraph.

A deliberate misspelling of lead, originally used in instructions given to printers to indicate which paragraphs constitute the lede, intended to avoid confusion with the word lead which may actually appear in the text of an article.[3][4] Compare dek (subhead) (modified from deck) and hed (headline) (from head).

NounEdit

lede (plural ledes)

  1. (chiefly US, journalism) The introductory paragraph or paragraphs of a newspaper, or a news or other type of article; the lead or lead-in. [from mid 20th c.]
    Synonym: intro
    • 1979, J. W. Click; Russell N. Baird, Magazine Editing and Production, 2nd edition, Dubuque, Iowa: W[illiam] C. Brown, →ISBN, page 90:
      Readers usually see the lead picture and read its caption first, before reading the lede of the article, so the article lede should not be a repetition of the caption.
    • 1999, Mike Godwin, “Who’s a Journalist?—II: Welcome the New Journalists on the Internet”, in Robert H. Giles and Robert W. Snyder, editors, What’s Next?: Problems & Prospects of Journalism, New Brunswick, N.J.; London: Transaction Publishers, published 2001, →ISBN, page 46:
      "How can Mr. On-line Guy learn to be a journalist if he didn't go through what I went through?" they [newspaper journalists] ask. "I needed the city editor to tell me how to write a graceful sentence, and I was a year into the job before I could craft a decent lede?"
    • 2007 February, Brian McGrory, chapter 40, in Strangled, New York, N.Y.: Atria Books, →ISBN, page 314:
      I was thrilled to be in possession of this nugget, which could probably take over the lede of my story. This essentially and truly implicated one of the most respected homicide detectives in Boston, all based on my initial tip.
    • 2008 October 15, Michael Tomasky, “Michael Tomasky’s Blog: This Morning’s Stuff You Need to Know”, in The Guardian[3], London: Guardian News & Media, archived from the original on 6 March 2016:
      The lede (as we spell it) story in today's NYT [The New York Times] is all about their new poll showing that [John] McCain is hurting himself, not [Barack] Obama, with the attacks. [] If something's the lede in the NYT, it tends to get discussed on cable TV all day, etc.
    • 2018, Branden Salas, “Reporting for Print Media”, in Basic Concept of Journalism, Waltham Abbey, Essex: Ed-Tech Press, published 2020, →ISBN, page 253:
      Like all forms of writing, there's no hard and fast rule about what makes a great lede. A good lede changes depending on the story you're writing. [] Ledes vary wildly, but you'll start to notice patterns and, more importantly, what kinds of ledes you like and feel are effective.
    • 2019, Naveed Saleh, “Narrative: Beginnings, Middles, and Ends”, in The Writer’s Guide to Self-editing: Essential Tips for Online and Print Publishing, Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, →ISBN, part VII (Global Considerations), page 225:
      Here are some different types of ledes: [] · Scenario ledes use narrative elements to describe a place of particular importance to the story. / · Narrative ledes begin at a chronological beginning. [] · First-person anecdotal ledes begin with a relevant anecdote that involves the writer. Service and celebrity pieces often begin with first-person ledes.
Usage notesEdit

The word, which has entered ordinary usage, was originally journalistic jargon. In 1990, the American author and journalist William Safire (1929–2009) was still able to say: “You will not find this spelling in dictionaries; it is still an insiders' variant, steadily growing in frequency of use. [] Will lede break out of its insider status and find its way into general use? [] To suggest this is becoming standard would be misledeing [] But it has earned its place as a variant spelling, soon to overtake the original spelling for the beginning of a news article.”[5]

Derived termsEdit
  • bury the lede
  • lede to kum (a placeholder for ‘lead to come’, spelled this way so it is not inadvertently thought to be part of the article)
  • nulede
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See lead.

VerbEdit

lede

  1. Obsolete spelling of lead (to guide)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ lẹ̄d(e, n.(2)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “† lede, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020.
  3. ^ lede, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2019; “lede, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  4. ^ Alternatively, it has been claimed that the word was misspelled to avoid confusion with lead (strip of type metal used for positioning type in the frame) (pronounced /lɛd/): see “The Maven’s Word of the Day: lede”, in Random House[1], 28 November 2000, archived from the original on 2001-04-17.
  5. ^ William Safire (18 November 1990), “On language: (HED) folo my lede (UNHED)”, in The New York Times Magazine[2], New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2021-07-03, section 6, page 22.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit

AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lede

  1. plural of lid

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lede

  1. vocative singular of led

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈleːðə/, [ˈle̝ːð̩], [ˈle̝ːð̩˕˗ˠ]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse leiða (to lead), from Proto-Germanic *laidijaną (to lead), cognate with English lead, German leiten. It is a causative of the verb *līþaną (to go, pass).

VerbEdit

lede (past tense ledede or ledte, past participle ledet or ledt)

  1. to manage, run
  2. to head, direct
  3. to lead, guide
  4. to conduct
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse leita (to seek, search), from Proto-Germanic *wlaitōną, cognate with Old English wlātian (to look upon), Gothic 𐍅𐌻𐌰𐌹𐍄𐍉𐌽 (wlaitōn, to look around).

VerbEdit

lede (past tense ledte, past participle ledt)

  1. to look, search for
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse leiða, derived from the adjective Old Norse leiðr (Danish led (disgusting)).

NounEdit

lede c (singular definite leden, not used in plural form)

  1. disgust, distaste, loathing
InflectionEdit
AntonymsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

AdjectiveEdit

lede

  1. definite of led
  2. plural of led

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of lijden

AnagramsEdit

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. second-person plural imperative of ler

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛ.de/
  • Rhymes: -ɛde
  • Syllabification: lè‧de

VerbEdit

lede

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ledere

Middle DutchEdit

NounEdit

lêde

  1. dative singular of lêet

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English lēode (people, men), plural of lēod, from Proto-West Germanic *liudī, plural of *liud(i), from Proto-Germanic *liudīz, plural of *liudiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁léwdʰeyes, plural of *h₁léwdʰis.

Akin to Old Frisian liod, Old Saxon liud, Old Norse ljóðr, lýðr, Old High German liut, Dutch lieden.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lede (plural ledes or lede or (early) leden) (poetic)

  1. A (male) human; a man:
    1. A vassal or subject.
    2. A servant or retainer.
    3. A ruler; one with governing authority.
  2. (collectively) People, folk.
  3. A nation; a people.
  4. A race or stock; one's kindred.
  5. Real estate; owned land.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: lede (obsolete)
  • Scots: leid
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lede

  1. Alternative form of led (lead)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

lede

  1. Alternative form of leden (language)

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. Alternative form of leden (to lead)

A blysful lyf þou says I lede; Perle Section 15. Anonymous 15th century.

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. Alternative form of leden (to cover in lead)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse leiða, and Danish lede.

VerbEdit

lede (imperative led, present tense leder, passive ledes, simple past and past participle leda or ledet, present participle ledende)

  1. to lead
  2. to guide

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. second-person plural imperative of ler

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the nominal use (masculine inflection) of adjective led (evil), in the more original synonym den lede frestaren (the evil tempter).

AdjectiveEdit

lede

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of led.

NounEdit

lede c

  1. the evil one, the loathsome or disgusting one; the devil, Satan