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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek λέξις (léxis, diction”, “word), from λεγ- (leg-, to speak).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lexis (countable and uncountable, plural lexises or lexes or lexeis)

  1. (linguistics) The set of all words and phrases in a language.
  2. (pedagogy, TEFL) Words, collocations, and common phrases in a language; vocabulary and word combinations.
    • 2014, Paul Lindsay, Teaching English Worldwide, page 346:
      By the 1980s, English language teachers generally had begun to realize that there had been a neglect of lexis in teaching methods and coursebooks. [] The basic truth that without vocabulary or lexis we can't express anything had to be restated and a new approach to teaching lexis was needed.
  3. The vocabulary used by a writer
    In this broadsheet newspaper, the reporter uses a complicated and formal lexis which I find hard to understand.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 lexis” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek λέξις (léxis).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lexis f (irregular, genitive lexeōs); third declension

  1. A word.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (irregular, Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lexis
Genitive lexeōs
Dative
Accusative lexeis
Ablative
Vocative

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lexis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lexis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lexis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lexis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin