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See also: sílex

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin silex.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

silex (countable and uncountable, plural silexes)

  1. (archaic) Flint.
  2. A finely ground relatively pure form of silicas used as a paint filler etc.
    • 1864, Fitz-Hugh Ludlow in The Atlantic
      Every little cold gust that I observed in the Colorado country had this corkscrew character [] an auger, of diameter varying from an inch to a thousand feet, capable of altering its direction so as to bore curved holes, revolving with incalculable rapidity, and armed with a cutting edge of silex.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin silex.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /si.lɛks/
  • (file)

NounEdit

silex m (plural silex)

  1. flint

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain. Sometimes compared to silīgō and siliqua, both of unclear origin as well. De Vaan suggests that these are derivatives of silex, which have undergone a semantic shift “pebble” > “small pod”.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

silex m or f (genitive silicis); third declension

  1. pebble, stone, flint
  2. rock, crag
  3. lava

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative silex silicēs
Genitive silicis silicum
Dative silicī silicibus
Accusative silicem silicēs
Ablative silice silicibus
Vocative silex silicēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • silex in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • silex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • silex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to pave a road: viam sternere (silice, saxo)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “silex, -icis”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 564