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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English luxurious, from Old French luxurios (modern French luxurieux), from Latin luxuriosus (rank, luxuriant, profuse, excessive, immoderate), from luxuria (rankness, luxury), from luxus (extravagance, luxury).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /lʌɡˈʒʊɹ.i.əs/, /lʌɡˈzjʊɹ.i.əs/, /lʌkˈsjʊɹ.i.əs/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /lʌɡˈʒʊɹ.i.əs/, /lʌkˈʃʊɹ.i.əs/

AdjectiveEdit

luxurious (comparative more luxurious, superlative most luxurious)

  1. Very fine in quality and comfortable.
    a luxurious hotel suite
  2. (dated) Enjoying the pleasures of luxury.
    • 1857, Lectures Delivered Before the Young Men's Christian Association
      When one looks at the elegantly dressed people round the gaming table, who perhaps laugh at everything which impresses other people with awe, who scoff at the Church and the Bible, one could scarcely think it possible that these enlightened, pleasure-loving, luxurious men of the world, carry on in secret, cabalistic nonsense, turning over cards, fortune telling, studying the significance of signs and dreams []

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French luxurios, from Latin luxuriosus; equivalent to luxurie +‎ -ous.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lukˈsjuːriˌuːs/, /lukˈsjuːrius/

AdjectiveEdit

luxurious

  1. Lusty, lascivious; sexually transgressive.
  2. Shocking; surprising in a negative way.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit