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DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ljúga, from Proto-Germanic *leuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewgʰ- (to tell a lie).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lyːvə/, [ˈlyːwə]

VerbEdit

lyve (imperative lyv, infinitive at lyve, present tense lyver, past tense løj, perfect tense har løjet)

  1. to lie (tell an untruth)
  2. to fib

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Danish lyve and Old Norse ljúga, from Proto-Germanic *leuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewgʰ- (to tell a lie). Cognate with Swedish ljuga, Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌿𐌲𐌰𐌽 (liugan), German lügen, Dutch liegen, and English lie.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lyve (imperative lyv, present tense lyver, passive lyves, simple past løy, past participle løyet, present participle lyvende)

  1. (intransitive) lie (to give false information intentionally)
    1867, Henrik Ibsen, Peer Gynt, Gyldendal (1898–1902), volume 3, page 267,
    Peer, du lyver!
    Peer, you're lying!
  2. (intransitive) lie (to convey a false image or impression)
    Bildet lyver
    The picture lies

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit