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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English harre, herre, from Old English heorra (hinge; cardinal point), from Proto-Germanic *herzô (hinge), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerd- (to move, sway, swing, jump). Cognate with Scots herre, harr, har (hinge), Dutch harre, her, har (hinge), Icelandic hjarri (hinge), Latin cardō (hinge).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

har (plural hars)

  1. (dialectal) A hinge.

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

har

  1. A sound of laughter, with a sarcastic connotation.

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German har.

AdverbEdit

har

  1. (Uri) hither, here (to this place)

ReferencesEdit


BasqueEdit

CimbrianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German hār, from Proto-Germanic *hērą. Compare German Haar, Dutch haar, English hair, Swedish hår.

NounEdit

har n

  1. (Luserna, Thirteen Communities, anatomy) hair

ReferencesEdit

  • Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

har

  1. present tense of have

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

har f (plural harren)

  1. (dated) hinge
    Synonym: scharnier

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

har f (plural harren, diminutive harretje n)

  1. (dialectal, chiefly diminutive) gap, narrow opening (especially of doors, windows and hatches)
    Synonym: kier

FaroeseEdit

AdverbEdit

har (not comparable)

  1. there

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

har

  1. h-prothesized form of ar

Koyra ChiiniEdit

NounEdit

har

  1. man

ReferencesEdit

  • Jeffrey Heath, A Grammar of Koyra Chiini: The Songhay of Timbuktu

Middle EnglishEdit

DeterminerEdit

har

  1. (chiefly West Midland and Kentish dialectal) Alternative form of here (their)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

har

  1. present tense of ha

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

har

  1. present tense of ha

OccitanEdit

VerbEdit

har

  1. (Gascony) Alternative form of faire

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hairaz, from Proto-Indo-European *key-, *koy-. Cognate with Old High German hēr (German hehr (august, holy)), Old Norse hárr (grey), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐍃 (hais, torch), Old Saxon hēr. Non-Germanic cognates include Sanskrit केतु (ketu, light, torch).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hār

  1. Grey-haired, old and grey, venerable.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hērą, from Proto-Indo-European *keres- (rough hair, bristle). Compare Old Saxon hār, Old English her, hǣr, Old Norse hár.

NounEdit

hār n

  1. hair

DescendantsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hár, from Proto-Germanic *hērą.

NounEdit

hār n

  1. hair

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek χάρις (kháris).

NounEdit

har m

  1. grace

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

har

  1. present tense of ha.

UzbekEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Persian هر (har).

DeterminerEdit

har

  1. each
  2. every
  3. any

West FrisianEdit

PronounEdit

har

  1. her (object and possessive)
  2. them
  3. their

Usage notesEdit

  • Harren is used for "their" when there is one thing being possessed by all of "them". "Har" is used for "their" when more than one thing is being possessed.