See also: magnés and mágnes

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magnēs.

NounEdit

magnes

  1. Obsolete form of magnet.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for magnes in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

magnes

  1. second-person singular present indicative of magner
  2. second-person singular present subjunctive of magner

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μαγνήτης λίθος (magnḗtēs líthos, Magnesian stone), after Lydian city Magnesia ad Sipylum (modern-day Manisa, Turkey), named after the Greek region of Μαγνησία (Magnēsía), whence came the colonist who founded it. In ancient times the city was a primary source of mysterious stones that could attract or repel each other, which were eventually named after it.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magnēs f (genitive magnētis); third declension

  1. magnet, lodestone

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative magnēs magnētēs
Genitive magnētis magnētum
Dative magnētī magnētibus
Accusative magnēta
magnētem
magnētēs
Ablative magnēte magnētibus
Vocative magnēs magnētēs

AdjectiveEdit

magnēs (genitive magnētis); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. magnetic

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative magnēs magnētēs magnētia
Genitive magnētis magnētium
Dative magnētī magnētibus
Accusative magnētem magnēs magnētēs magnētia
Ablative magnētī magnētibus
Vocative magnēs magnētēs magnētia

ReferencesEdit

  • magnes in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • magnes in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magnes in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • magnes in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • magnes in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magnes in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magnēs, from Ancient Greek μαγνήτης λίθος (magnḗtēs líthos, Magnesian stone). Doublet of magnete.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɡnɛs/, /ˈmaɡnɛːs/

NounEdit

magnes

  1. (rare) lodestone (a magnetic stone that is an ore of iron)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: magnes (obsolete)

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magnēs, from Ancient Greek μαγνῆτις (magnêtis). Doublet of magnez.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magnes m inan (diminutive magnesik)

  1. (electromagnetism) magnet (piece of material that attracts some metals by magnetism)
  2. (figuratively) magnet (person or thing that attracts)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • magnes in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • magnes in Polish dictionaries at PWN