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See also: Malarkey

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EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

American English, of unknown origin; perhaps from Greek μαλακία (malakía, stupidity, idiocy, nonsense, bullshit). Popularized by Thomas Aloysius Dorgan, Irish American cartoonist who started using it in cartoons on March 9, 1922.[1]

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

malarkey (uncountable)

  1. (informal) Nonsense; rubbish. [from 1920s]
    • 2001 [1870], Frederick Paul Walter, “chapter 29”, in 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas, translation of Vingt mille lieues sous les mers by Jules Verne:
      "An underwater tunnel!" he exclaimed. "A connection between two seas! Who ever heard of such malarkey!"
    I decided it was a bunch of malarkey and stopped reading about halfway through.

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