See also: Humbug

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First in use about 1735-40. Etymology unknown. The Oxford English Dictionary states "The facts as to its origin appear to have been lost, even before the word became common enough to excite attention". Possibly from hummer ‎((slang) An obvious lie) or from hum ‎((dialectal and slang) to delude, impose on, cajole) + bug ‎(a specter, goblin). John Camden Hotten suggests a link to the name of the German city of Hamburg, "from which town so many false bulletins and reports came during the war in the last century".

NounEdit

humbug ‎(plural humbugs)

  1. (slang) A hoax, prank or jest.
  2. (slang) A fraud or sham.
  3. (slang) Nonsense.
  4. (slang) A fraudster, cheat, or hypocrite.
  5. (US slang) Anything worrying, complicated, unpleasant, offensive, troublesome or a misunderstanding, especially if trivial.
  6. (US, African American Vernacular, slang) A fight.
  7. (US, African American Vernacular, slang, dated) A gang.
  8. (US, crime, slang) A false arrest on trumped-up charges.
  9. (Britain) A type of chewy sweet (candy).

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

humbug

  1. (slang) Nonsense!

VerbEdit

humbug ‎(third-person singular simple present humbugs, present participle humbugging, simple past and past participle humbugged)

  1. (slang) To play a trick on someone, to cheat, to swindle, to deceive.
  2. (slang, obsolete) To waste time talking.
  3. (US, African American Vernacular, slang) To fight, to act tough.

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈhumbuɡ]
  • Hyphenation: hum‧bug

NounEdit

humbug ‎(plural humbugok)

  1. humbug

InterjectionEdit

humbug

  1. humbug!
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