See also: Mancia, -mancia, and -mancía

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian mancia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mancia

  1. tip, gratuity
    • 1963, Thomas Pynchon, V.:
      Its landscape is one of inanimate monuments and buildings; near-inanimate barmen, taxi-drivers, bellhops, guides: there to do any bidding, to varying degrees of efficiency, on receipt of the recommended baksheesh, pourboire, mancia, tip.
    • 1980, Anthony Burgess, Earthly Powers:
      We got up and Don Carlo looked critically at the money I had left on the table. ‘That is too much. A mancia of two lire. The waiter will be dissatisfied with those who leave a smaller but more rational mancia.’ ‘You disapprove of generosity? Perhaps they will call me Don Quixote della mancia.’ Neither of them thought that funny.

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ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Old French manche (sleeve).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mancia f (plural mance)

  1. tip (in a restaurant, etc.)
    • 2003, Antonio Tabucchi, chapter XVIII, in Sostiene Pereira : una testimonianza [Pereira Declares], Rome: La biblioteca di Repubblica, published 1994, →ISBN, page 121:
      Salutò Manuel e gli lasciò una buona mancia.
      He saluted Manuel and left him a good tip.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ mancia in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

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