See also: Manche and manché

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French manche.

NounEdit

manche (plural manches)

  1. Obsolete form of maunch (a sleeve)
  2. The neck of a violin, etc.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for manche in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɑ̃ʃ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French manche, from Old French manche, from Latin manica, from manus (hand).

NounEdit

manche f (plural manches)

  1. sleeve (clothing)
  2. (sports) round
  3. (tennis) set
    Synonym: set
    la troisième manchethe third set
  4. (snooker) frame
  5. (baseball) inning

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French manche, from Old French manche, from Vulgar Latin *manicus, from Latin manus (hand). Compare Italian manico.

NounEdit

manche m (plural manches)

  1. handle
  2. (popular) unhandy person
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Italian mancia.

NounEdit

manche f (plural manches)

  1. begging (for money)
    Il fait la manche tous les dimanche matin devant l'église.
    He begs every Sunday morning in front of the church.
Usage notesEdit

Only found in faire la manche.

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

manche

  1. inflection of manch:
    1. nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

manche

  1. Feminine plural of adjective manco.

NounEdit

manche f (plural manche)

  1. heat (sports)
  2. hand, round (of cards)

NounEdit

manche f pl

  1. plural of manca

Middle FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French manche, from Latin manica.

NounEdit

manche f (plural manches)

  1. sleeve

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French manche, from Vulgar Latin *manicus, from Latin manus.

NounEdit

manche m (plural manches)

  1. handle

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French manche, from Latin manica, from manus (hand) (compare main).

NounEdit

manche f (plural manches)

  1. (Jersey) sleeve

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin manica.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

manche f (oblique plural manches, nominative singular manche, nominative plural manches)

  1. sleeve

DescendantsEdit

  • English: maunch
  • Middle French: manche

Etymology 2Edit

From Vulgar Latin *manicus, from Latin manus.

NounEdit

manche m (oblique plural manches, nominative singular manches, nominative plural manche)

  1. handle

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French manche.

NounEdit

manche m (plural manches)

  1. (aviation) yoke (column-mounted control wheel of an aircraft)

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

manche

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of manchar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of manchar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of manchar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of manchar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

manche

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of manchar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of manchar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of manchar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of manchar.