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See also: Marquis

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French: marquis; Old French: markis, marchis; Late Latin: marchensis; Old High German: marcha. Frankish *marka, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary).

Meaning is “lord of the march”, in sense of march (border country).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɑː.kwɪs/
  • (US) IPA(key): [mɑɹ.ˈkʰiː], [ˈmɑɹ.kʷəs]

NounEdit

marquis (plural marquises or marquis)

  1. A nobleman in England, France, and Germany, of a rank next below that of duke, but above a count. Originally, the marquis was an officer whose duty was to guard the marches or frontiers of the kingdom. The office has ceased, and the name is now a mere title conferred by patent.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for marquis in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

marquis

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive form of marcar

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

Old French marchis, from the same origin as marcher.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

marquis m (plural marquis)

  1. marquess (title of nobility)

Further readingEdit