See also: Duke and dûke

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Old French duc, through Middle English duk, duke, from Latin dux, ducis. Displaced native Old English heretoga. Was present as duc in late Old English, from the same Latin source. Doublet of dux and doge.

The “fist” sense is thought to be Cockney rhyming slang where “Duke(s) of York” = fork. Fork is itself Cockney slang for hand, and thus fist.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

duke (plural dukes)

  1. The male ruler of a duchy (female equivalent: duchess).
  2. The sovereign of a small state.
  3. A high title of nobility; the male holder of a dukedom.
    Hypernyms: title, holder
    Hyponyms: duc (French duke), herzog (German duke)
    Coordinate terms: baron, count, countess, earl, marquis, marquess, viscount, prince, monarch
  4. A grand duke.
  5. Any of various nymphalid butterflies of the Asian genera Bassarona and Dophla.
  6. (slang, usually in the plural) A fist.
    Put up your dukes!
    • 1952, Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man, Penguin Books (2014), page 438:
      “Your friend sure knows how to use his dukes. Biff, bang! One, two, and the copʼs on his ass!”
    • 1963, J P Donleavy, A Singular Man, published 1963 (USA), page 19:
      "How did the sport go."
      "O sparred a few rounds. Let the instructor have a few on the button."
      "You must be tough."
      "I can handle my dukes."

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

duke (third-person singular simple present dukes, present participle duking, simple past and past participle duked)

  1. (transitive, informal) To hit or beat with the fists.
    • 2003, John A. Dinan, Private Eyes in the Comics, →ISBN, page 65:
      It seems that PI Rainer was duked by his wife [] .
  2. (slang, transitive) To give cash to; to give a tip to.
    Synonym: tip
    I duked him twenty dollars.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024) “dukes”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

from older ntuke from tu Also used as tue in Gheg.

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

duke

  1. A particle which precedes a participle to form a gerundive adverbial phrase.
    duke kënduar — (while) singing, by singing

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /duke/ [d̪u.ke]
  • Rhymes: -uke
  • Hyphenation: du‧ke

Verb edit

duke

  1. (Northern or archaic) Third-person singular (hark), taking third-person singular (hura) as direct object, future indicative form of izan.

Usage notes edit

Linguistically, this verb form can be seen as belonging to the reconstructed citation form edun instead of izan.

Bikol Central edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish duque.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: du‧ke
  • IPA(key): /ˈduke/, [ˈd̪u.ke]

Noun edit

dúke

  1. duke

Related terms edit

Middle English edit

Noun edit

duke

  1. Alternative form of duk (duke)

Scots edit

Verb edit

duke (third-person singular simple present dukes, present participle dukin, simple past dukit, past participle dukit)

  1. (intransitive) To cut into a queue, without permission.
  2. (transitive) To cut into a queue in front of someone.
    Oi, dinnae duke us!
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish duque (duke), from Old French duc, from Latin dux.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: du‧ke
  • IPA(key): /ˈduke/, [ˈdu.xɛ]

Noun edit

duke (Baybayin spelling ᜇᜓᜃᜒ)

  1. duke

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • duke”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018