marcher

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English marche; from Anglo-Norman and Old French. Akin to Old English germearc, Gothic marka (marka, boundary).[1][2]

NounEdit

marcher (plural marchers)

  1. (historical) An inhabitant of a march (border country); specifically, a marcher lord. [from 14th c.]
  2. (historical) A border territory, a march (now only in (attributive) use). [from 15th c.]
    • 2013, Simon Winder, Danubia, Picador 2014, p. 42:
      Here is a scene of the marcher state of which they were margraves being turned into a duchy under Henry II Jasomirgott, who has made his capital at Vienna.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

march +‎ -er.

NounEdit

marcher (plural marchers)

  1. One who marches; one who participates in a march.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French marchier, from Frankish *markōn, from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *merg-, *marǵ- (edge, boundary, border). Cf. also marquer.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

marcher

  1. to walk
    Synonym: aller
    Il marche au milieu de la rue.
    He is walking in the middle of the street
  2. to travel; to move; to march
    Synonyms: avancer, déplacer, mouvoir
  3. (figuratively) to work, to function
    Synonym: fonctionner
    Comment ça marche ?How does it work?
    Cet appareil ne marche plus.This device quit working.
  4. to step
    Marcher sur le pied de quelqu’un.To step on the foot of someone
  5. to cooperate
    Je ne marche plus.I am no longer in.
  6. (intransitive) to believe
    Il marche.He believes my joke.
    Il m'a fait marcher.He took me for a ride.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: marxar
  • German: marschieren
  • Spanish: marchar

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French marchier.

VerbEdit

marcher

  1. to walk (travel on foot)

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French marqueur.

NounEdit

marcher m (plural marcheri)

  1. marker, scorer

DeclensionEdit