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See also: mâssif

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French massif, from Middle French massif, from Latin massa, from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (mâza, barley-cake, lump (of dough)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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Wikipedia

massif (plural massifs)

  1. A principal mountain mass.
  2. A block of the earth's crust bounded by faults or flexures and displaced as a unit without internal change; normally consists of gneisses and schists
    • 2011, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Pulphead:
      The southern borders of these states are keyed to the same horizontal projection, one surveyed by the frontier planter William Byrd in 1728, while the rivers forming their northern extents fall back just opposite each other from the flanks of the Appalachian massif.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

masse (mass) +‎ -if

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ma.sif/
  • (file)

NounEdit

massif m (plural massifs)

  1. massif

AdjectiveEdit

massif (feminine singular massive, masculine plural massifs, feminine plural massives)

  1. massive

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French massif; equivalent to mass +‎ -if.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

massif

  1. (Late Middle English) weighty, massy, weighing very much.
  2. (Late Middle English, rare) massive, huge, enormous.
  3. (Late Middle English, rare) not sharp, unsharpened, coarse.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit