massa

See also: mässa, Massa, and mássá

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

massa ‎(plural massas)

  1. (US, historical, colloquial) Eye dialect spelling of master, representing African American Vernacular English.

Usage notesEdit

Associated with slavery.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin massa, from Ancient Greek μᾶζα ‎(mâza, bread).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

massa m, f ‎(masculine plural massos, feminine plural masses)

  1. too much, too many

AdverbEdit

massa

  1. too (to an excessive degree)
  2. excessively, too much

NounEdit

massa f ‎(plural masses)

  1. mass
  2. dough

Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin massa ‎(mass).

NounEdit

massa

  1. mass

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary][1], Simferopol: Dolya, ISBN 966-7980-89-8

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

massa f, m ‎(plural massa's, diminutive massaatje n)

  1. mass, large amount
  2. (physics) mass
  3. A large group of people.
    Was er veel volk? — Massa's!
    Were there a lot of people? — Masses!

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

massa

  1. mass
  2. bulk

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of massa (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative massa massat
genitive massan massojen
partitive massaa massoja
illative massaan massoihin
singular plural
nominative massa massat
accusative nom. massa massat
gen. massan
genitive massan massojen
massainrare
partitive massaa massoja
inessive massassa massoissa
elative massasta massoista
illative massaan massoihin
adessive massalla massoilla
ablative massalta massoilta
allative massalle massoille
essive massana massoina
translative massaksi massoiksi
instructive massoin
abessive massatta massoitta
comitative massoineen

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

massa

  1. third-person singular past historic of masser

ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin massa, from Ancient Greek μᾶζα ‎(mâza, bread).

NounEdit

massa f ‎(plural masse)

  1. mass (all senses)
  2. crowd

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μᾶζα ‎(mâza, bread).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

massa f ‎(genitive massae); first declension

  1. mass, bulk (of material)
  2. load, burden
  3. dough
  4. lump

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative massa massae
genitive massae massārum
dative massae massīs
accusative massam massās
ablative massā massīs
vocative massa massae

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese massa, from Latin massa ‎(mass; dough), from Ancient Greek μᾶζα ‎(mâza, bread), from μάσσω ‎(mássō, I handle; I knead), probably from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ǵ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

massa f (plural massas)

  1. dough (mix of flour and other ingredients)
  2. a concentration of substance or tightly packed objects
  3. mortar (mixture for bonding bricks)
  4. multitude (a great mass of people)
  5. (uncountable, physics) mass (quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume)
  6. (Brazil, slang, uncountable) money

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:massa.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

massa m, f ‎(plural massas, comparable)

  1. (Brazil, informal) cool (in fashion, part of or fitting the in-crowd)
  2. (Brazil, informal) great; amazing; awesome

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:massa.

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

massa c

  1. a mass (of people; the masses), a large crowd
  2. a lot (of), many
    en massa saker
    a lot of things
    massor av saker
    lots of things
  3. a mass (a substance)
  4. (physics) mass (as measured in kilograms)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of massa 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative massa massan massor massorna
Genitive massas massans massors massornas

Related termsEdit

Read in another language