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See also: Mastiff

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

An aberrant derivation from Old French mastin (modern French mâtin), from Vulgar Latin mansuetīnus (tamed (animal)), from Latin mansuetus (tamed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mastiff (plural mastiffs)

  1. An old breed of powerful, deep-chested, and smooth-coated dog used chiefly as a watchdog and guard dog.
    • 1605: William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act III, Scene VI
      Avaunt, you curs! Be thy mouth or black or white, Tooth that poisons if it bite; Mastiff, greyhound, mongrel grim, Hound or spaniel, brach or him.
    • 1896: Theodore Roosevelt, Ranch Life and the Hunting-Trail, The Century Co., chapter 11
      The Mastiff is a good fighter, and can kill a wildcat, taking the necessary punishment well, as we found out when we once trapped one of these small lynxes.

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