Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Feom Old English magan (stomachs), plural of maga, from Proto-Germanic *maganiz, plural of *magô; equivalent to mawe +‎ -en (plural suffix).

NounEdit

mawen

  1. plural of mawe

Etymology 2Edit

Feom Old English magan (to use, to win, to be able to).

VerbEdit

mawen

  1. Alternative form of mowen (to be able to)

Etymology 3Edit

Feom Old English māwan (to mow).

VerbEdit

mawen

  1. Alternative form of mowen (to mow)

YolaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Raymond Hickey (Irish English: History and Present-Day Forms) suggests the stress of /ˈwʊmən/ "woman" and /ˈwɪmɪn/ "women" was first shifted and the stressed vowel lengthened, yielding /wuˈmaːn/ and /wɪˈmiːn/, followed by apheresis to /maːn/ and /miːn/, followed by the formation of a medial glide, yielding the singular mawen /mawən/ "woman" and plural meyen /mɪjɪn/ "women".

NounEdit

mawen (plural meyen)

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)