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BretonEdit

VerbEdit

maga

  1. to feed

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

maga f (plural magues)

  1. female equivalent of mag

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested in the 12th century in local Latin documents. From Suevic or Gothic, from Proto-Germanic *magô (stomach). Cognate of English maw.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maga f (plural magas)

  1. guts (of fish)
    • 1973, Álvaro Cunqueiro, A Cociña Galega. Vigo: Galaxia, p. 106:
      A sardiña fresca ou revenida, debe ir á parrilla enteira, con toda a súa maga ou tripa, e sin escamar
      The sardines, either fresh or salted, must be grilled with their guts or entrails, and with their scales

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rivas Quintas, Eligio (2015). Dicionario etimolóxico da lingua galega. Santiago de Compostela: Tórculo. →ISBN, s.v. maga.
  2. ^ Corominas, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997), “amagar”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico, Madrid: Gredos

Further readingEdit

  • maga” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • maga” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • maga” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • maga” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Lexicalization of mag (body) +‎ -a (possessive suffix). This original meaning of the root word cannot be found in Hungarian, but it is attested in related languages.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɒɡɒ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ma‧ga

Pronoun 1Edit

maga (plural maguk)

  1. (personal) you (formal, singular)

Usage notesEdit

There is some stylistic difference between maga and ön, although both are used with the formal third-person verb forms. For historical reasons, maga is generally held to be somewhat disrespectful or even deprecating between speakers of the same social status and age, though it is still widely used one-sidedly in conversations where one of the speakers is superior in status (e.g. by a teacher). It is also the preferred form of address in more familiar relations and among older generations or those living in rural communities.[2]

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative maga
accusative magát
dative magának
instrumental magával
causal-final magáért
translative magává
terminative magáig
essive-formal magaként
essive-modal
inessive magában
superessive magán
adessive magánál
illative magába
sublative magára
allative magához
elative magából
delative magáról
ablative magától

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Pronoun 2Edit

maga

  1. (reflexive) oneself, himself, herself, itself
    Péter lelőtte magát.Peter has shot himself.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative maga
accusative magát
dative magának
instrumental magával
causal-final magáért
translative magává
terminative magáig
essive-formal magaként
essive-modal
inessive magában
superessive magán
adessive magánál
illative magába
sublative magára
allative magához
elative magából
delative magáról
ablative magától

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN
  2. ^ György Rákosi: Maga vagy ön? in Névmásblog, 15 September 2014

IcelandicEdit

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

maga f (plural maghe, masculine mago)

  1. magician, sorceress, enchantress, conjurer
  2. charmer, beguiler

AdjectiveEdit

maga

  1. Feminine singular of adjective mago.

Jamaican CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English meager/meagre.

AdjectiveEdit

maga

  1. skinny
    Sorry fe maga dog, maga dog, turn round bite you — Peter Tosh, Maga Dog, 1964

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

maga

  1. nominative feminine singular of magus
  2. nominative neuter plural of magus
  3. accusative neuter plural of magus
  4. vocative feminine singular of magus
  5. nominative neuter plural of magus

AdjectiveEdit

magā

  1. ablative feminine singular of magus

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the verb magan.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

maga

  1. capable

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *magô, from Proto-Indo-European *mak- (bag, belly). Cognate with Old Frisian maga (West Frisian mage), Old Saxon mago (Low German mage), Middle Dutch maghe (Dutch maag), Old High German mago (German Magen), Old Norse magi (Swedish mage). The Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *makno- (Welsh megin (bellows)), Proto-Slavic *mošьnā (Old Church Slavonic мошьна (mošĭna), Russian мошна (mošna, pocket, bag)), Baltic *maka- (Lithuanian mãkas (purse)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maga m

  1. stomach
  2. maw

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: maȝe, maghe, mawe

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *mēgô (relative, in-law), from Proto-Indo-European *mag'- (to be able, help). Cognate with Old Frisian mēch (relative, kinsman), Old Saxon māg (a relation), Old High German māg (relative, kinsman), Old Norse mágr (father-in-law), Gothic 𐌼𐌴𐌲𐍃 (mēgs, son-in-law). More at may.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

māga m

  1. son
  2. relative

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Inflected forms.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

māga

  1. genitive plural of mǣġ

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maga

  1. nominative plural of magu
  2. accusative plural of magu
  3. genitive singular of magu
  4. genitive plural of magu
  5. dative singular of magu

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

maga f (plural magas)

  1. female equivalent of mago

AdjectiveEdit

maga

  1. Feminine singular of adjective mago.

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

maga f (plural magas)

  1. female magician, female conjurer

Related termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

maga

  1. Feminine singular of adjective mago.

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse magi, from Proto-Germanic *magô.

NounEdit

maga m

  1. Stomach.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

maga

  1. To fit in one’s stomach, digest.