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See also: möän and Moan

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mone, mane, mān, (also as mene), from Old English *mān, *mǣn (complaint; lamentation), from Proto-Germanic *mainō (opinion; mind). Cognate with Old Frisian mēne (opinion), Old High German meina (opinion). Old English *mān, *mǣn is inferred from Old English mǣnan (to complain over; grieve; mourn). More at mean.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moan (plural moans)

  1. a low, mournful cry of pain, sorrow or pleasure

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

moan (third-person singular simple present moans, present participle moaning, simple past and past participle moaned)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To complain about; to bemoan, to bewail; to mourn. [from 13th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      Much did the Craven seeme to mone his case […].
    • Prior
      Ye floods, ye woods, ye echoes, moan / My dear Columbo, dead and gone.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly poetic) To grieve. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To distress (someone); to sadden. [15th-17th c.]
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      which infinitely moans me
  4. (intransitive) To make a moan or similar sound. [from 18th c.]
  5. (transitive) To say in a moan, or with a moaning voice. [from 19th c.]
    ‘Please don't leave me,’ he moaned.
  6. (intransitive, colloquial) To complain; to grumble. [from 20th c.]

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *muɨn (beautiful) (compare Welsh mwyn (mild, gentle)), from Proto-Celtic *moinis (treasure, precious object) (compare Irish maoin (property, riches)), from Proto-Indo-European *moynis (compare Latin mūnis (obliging), Old English mǣne (common)), from *mey- (to change).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

moan

  1. thin, slender
    Synonym: tanav
    Antonym: tev

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

moan

  1. Genitive singular form of moa.

AnagramsEdit