See also: möän and Moan

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English mone, mane, mān, (also as mene), from Old English *mān, *mǣn (complaint; lamentation), from Proto-West Germanic *mainu, from Proto-Germanic *mainō (opinion; mind).

Cognate with Old Frisian mēne (opinion), Old High German meina (opinion). Old English *mān, *mǣn is inferred from Old English mǣnan (to complain over; grieve; mourn). More at mean.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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moan (plural moans)

  1. a low, mournful cry of pain, sorrow or pleasure
    let out a deep moan
    We heard the distant moan of a stag in pain.

Translations

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Verb

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moan (third-person singular simple present moans, present participle moaning, simple past and past participle moaned)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To complain about; to bemoan, to bewail; to mourn. [from 13th c.]
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly poetic) To grieve. [from 14th c.]
  3. (intransitive) To make a moan or similar sound. [from 18th c.]
    She moaned with pleasure and squirmed with delight from receiving oral sex.
  4. (transitive) To say in a moan, or with a moaning voice. [from 19th c.]
    ‘Please don't leave me,’ he moaned.
  5. (intransitive, colloquial) To complain; to grumble. [from 20th c.]
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To distress (someone); to sadden. [15th–17th c.]

Conjugation

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Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Breton

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle Breton moen, from Old Breton moin, from Proto-Brythonic *muɨn (beautiful). Compare Welsh mwyn (mild, gentle)), Irish maoin (property, riches)), Latin mūnis (obliging), Old English mǣne (common)).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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moan

  1. thin, slender
    Synonym: tanav
    Antonym: tev

Mutation

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Finnish

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Noun

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moan

  1. genitive singular of moa

Anagrams

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Yola

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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moan

  1. Alternative form of mawen
    • 1927, “ZONG OF TWI MAARKEET MOANS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 129, line 1:
      A moan vrim a Bearlough an anoor vrim a Baak,
      A woman from the Bearlough and another from the Beak,
    • 1927, “ZONG OF TWI MAARKEET MOANS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 129, line 7:
      Shu ztaared an shu ztudied hi near parshagh moan,
      She stared and she studied by the other passive woman,
    • 1927, “YOLA ZONG O BARONY VORTH”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 132, line 1:
      Billeen Scalaane an hys yola moan,
      Billy Scallan and his old woman,

Etymology 2

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From Middle English mone, from Old English mān, from Proto-West Germanic *mainu.

Noun

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moan

  1. moan
    • 1927, “LAMENT OF A WIDOW”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 130, line 1:
      Ochone! to fo shul Ich maak mee moan,
      Ochone, to whom shall I make my moan,

References

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  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland