See also: mean and meán-

Galician

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Etymology

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From Old Galician-Portuguese meão, from Latin mediānus. Doublet of mediano.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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meán m (plural meáns)

  1. chain or strap that connects both rigid parts of a flail
    Synonyms: cedoiro, loro

References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “meao”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “meao”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • mean” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.

Irish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Irish medón, from Latin mediānus.[2] Cognate with English mean. Compare Scottish Gaelic meadhan.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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meán (genitive singular masculine meáin, genitive singular feminine meáine, plural meána, comparative meáine)

  1. mid, central
  2. middle
  3. average

Declension

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Noun

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meán m (genitive singular meáin, nominative plural meáin)

  1. middle
  2. (mathematics) mean
  3. medium
  4. average
  5. (anatomy) middle, waist
  6. middle zone

Declension

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Derived terms

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
meán mheán not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ meán”, in Historical Irish Corpus, 1600–1926, Royal Irish Academy
  2. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “medón”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  3. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 297, page 105

Further reading

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