See also: MID, mid-, Mid., -mid, and mið

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɪd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪd
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mid, midde, from Old English midd (mid, middle, midway), from Proto-Germanic *midjaz (mid, middle, adjective), from Proto-Indo-European *médʰyos (between, in the middle, middle). Cognate with Dutch midden (in the middle), German Mitte (center, middle, mean), Icelandic miður (worse, less, adjective), Latin medius (middle, noun and adjective). See also middle.

AdjectiveEdit

mid (not comparable)

  1. Denoting the middle part.
    mid ocean
  2. Occupying a middle position; middle.
    mid finger
    mid hour of night
  3. (linguistics) Made with a somewhat elevated position of some certain part of the tongue, in relation to the palate; midway between the high and the low; said of certain vowel sounds, such as, /e o ɛ ɔ/.

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. Amid.
    Mid the best.
Derived termsEdit

See also those listed at Category:English words prefixed with mid-.

Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mid, midde, from Old English midd (midst, middle, noun), from Proto-Germanic *midją, *midjǭ, *midjô (middle, center) < *midjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *médʰyos (between, in the middle, middle). Cognate with German Mitte (center, middle, midst), Danish midje (middle), Icelandic midja (middle). See also median, Latin medianus.

NounEdit

mid (plural mids)

  1. (archaic) middle

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of mid-range.

NounEdit

mid (plural mids)

  1. (disc golf) A mid-range.

Etymology 4Edit

From or representing German mit or perhaps German Low German mid. Although Middle English had a native preposition mid with this same meaning ("with"), it had fallen out of use by the end of the 1300s[1] and survived into the modern English period only in the compounds mididone, midwife, and theremid.

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. (in representations of German-accented English) With.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

AnagramsEdit


German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • met (in some dialects)
  • mit (in some dialects)
  • möt (Low Prussian)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German mit, mid, from Old Saxon mid, from Proto-Germanic *midi (with), from Proto-Indo-European *medʰi-, *meta (with). Cognate with North Frisian mits (with), Dutch met (with), German mit (with). For more, see Middle English mid.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. (in some dialects) with

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

mi (what) +‎ -d (your, of yours, possessive suffix)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈmid]
  • Hyphenation: mid

PronounEdit

mid

  1. second-person singular single-possession possessive of mi

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative mid
accusative midet
dative midnek
instrumental middel
causal-final midért
translative middé
terminative midig
essive-formal midként
essive-modal
inessive midben
superessive miden
adessive midnél
illative midbe
sublative midre
allative midhez
elative midből
delative midről
ablative midtől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
midé
non-attributive
possessive - plural
midéi

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Old English mid (with, in conjunction with, in company with, together with, into the presence of, through, by means of, by, among, in, at (time), in the sight of, opinion of, preposition), from Proto-Germanic *midi (with), from Proto-Indo-European *medʰi-, *meta (with). Cognate with North Frisian mits (with), Dutch met (with), Low German mit (with), German mit (with), Danish med (with), Icelandic með (with), Ancient Greek μετά (metá, among, between, with), Albanian me (with, together), Sanskrit स्मत् (smat, together, at the same time).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. with
  2. amid, amidst
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inherited from Old English midd, from Proto-Germanic *midjaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mid

  1. mid-, middle, central, intermediate
  2. that is or are in the middle or intermediate in time
DescendantsEdit
  • English: mid
ReferencesEdit

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *midi, from Proto-Indo-European *met(e)h₂, from *me (with). Compare Old Saxon mid, Old High German mit, Old Norse með.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. with

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: mid

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *midi.

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. with

AdverbEdit

mid

  1. with, together, along