meridies

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a dissimilation of earlier *medīdiēs, derived from medius (middle) + diēs (day). The sense of 'south' is due to the southward orientation of the sun at noon in the northern hemisphere.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

merīdiēs m (genitive merīdiēī); fifth declension

  1. midday, noon
  2. south

DeclensionEdit

Fifth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative merīdiēs merīdiēs
Genitive merīdiēī merīdiērum
Dative merīdiēī merīdiēbus
Accusative merīdiem merīdiēs
Ablative merīdiē merīdiēbus
Vocative merīdiēs merīdiēs

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • meridies”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • meridies”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • meridies in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • meridies in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to lie to the east, west, south, north: spectare in (vergere ad) orientem (solem), occidentem (solem), ad meridiem, in septentriones